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SWITZERLAND. Lucerne Canton. 1892 AR Medal. PCGS SP64. By A. Schnyder. 60mm. 100.12gm. ERINNERUNG AN DEN MELDENTOD DER SCHWEIZER IN PARIS D. 10. AUGUST 2. 3. SEPT 1792 around, 1792 1892 in center. Three defending guards in varying degrees of conscio

1046319 | SWITZERLAND. Lucerne Canton. 1892 AR Medal. PCGS SP64. By A. Schnyder. 60mm. 100.12gm. ERINNERUNG AN DEN MELDENTOD DER SCHWEIZER IN PARIS D. 10. AUGUST 2. 3. SEPT 1792 around, 1792 1892 in center. Three defending guards in varying degrees of consciousness, bust of Captain Dürler, Commander of the 2nd Company of the 3rd Battalion, in medallion above, coats of arms of the 16 cantons and the allied city of Mühlhausen around / ALB. THORWALDSEN / OBERST PFYFFER / LUKAS AHORN around; HELVETIORUM FIDEI AC VIRTUTI / DIE X AUGUST II ET III SEPTEMBRIS MDCCXCII in center. Lion of Lucerne (or Lion Monument), busts of Colonel K. Pfyffer, Lukas Ahorn, and A. Thorwaldsen in medallions linked by laurel branches. Martin 92.

For the 100th Remembrance Day for the Swiss fallen in Paris.

Housed in an oversized holder.


Please use this link to verify the PCGS certification number 34499389




On October 6th, 1789, King Louis XVI was forced to move from the Palace of Versailles to Tuileries Palace in Paris after several attacks by mobs upon Versailles. Two years later, on August 10th, 1792, revolutionaries stormed Tuileries. Fighting broke out spontaneously after the Royal Family was escorted from the palace to take refuge with the Legislative Assembly. The Swiss Guards, a regiment of which had served the Royal Household of France since the early 17th century, ran low on ammunition and were overwhelmed by the superior numbers. A note written by the King half an hour after firing had commenced has survived, ordering the Swiss Guards to retire and return to their barracks. Delivered in the middle of the fighting, this was only acted on after their position had become untenable, and more than six hundred Swiss were killed during the fighting or massacred after their surrender. An estimated two hundred more died in prison of their wounds or were killed during the September Massacres that followed.

"The Lion lies in his lair in the perpendicular face of a low cliff — for he is carved from the living rock of the cliff. His size is colossal, his attitude is noble. His head is bowed, the broken spear is sticking in his shoulder, his protecting paw rests upon the lilies of France. Vines hang down the cliff and wave in the wind, and a clear stream trickles from above and empties into a pond at the base, and in the smooth surface of the pond the lion is mirrored, among the water-lilies.

Around about are green trees and grass. The place is a sheltered, reposeful woodland nook, remote from noise and stir and confusion — and all this is fitting, for lions do die in such places, and not on granite pedestals in public squares fenced with fancy iron railings. The Lion of Lucerne would be impressive anywhere, but nowhere so impressive as where he is."

— Mark Twain, A Tramp Abroad, 1880.
$950.00



 

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